Chelation Therapy

 

Chelation (pronounced key-lay-shun) is a chemical reaction that results in a bond being formed between a metal ion and an organic (i.e., carbon-based made mostly of carbon) molecule. The resulting complex, metal bound to molecule, is called a "chelate" and contains one or more rings of atoms in which the metal ion is so firmly bound it cannot escape. This allows the metal ion to be transported in the same manner as a prisoner, first handcuffed, then moved from one location to another.  

 

In distinction to the oral agents that serve to prevent atherosclerosis, intravenous chelation has been shown to actually reverse the effects of the disease. The agent used is ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid, also known as "EDTA," sold commercially as Sodium Edetate.

 EDTA is a synthetic amino acid. The usual dose is 2000-3000 mg (adjusted to body weight, age, and kidney function) added to 500 ml of "carrier solution" sterile water, salt solution or 5% dextrose solution with a mixture of vitamins and minerals. Most chelation doctors add vitamin C along with B vitamins, bicarbonate and magnesium.  

The solution is infused slowly, one drop per second, and one treatment requires about three hours. The prisoner (calcium) is moved out of the body using handcuffs (EDTA). The half life of EDTA in the body is one hour; i.e., one-half is removed (filtered into the urine) after one hour, another half of what is left is removed after one more hour, etc. Within 24 hours 99% of the EDTA is gone from the body, and you are left with only the therapeutic benefit.

  

 

How does EDTA work ?
Plaquex Therapy
References